When I discovered the wonderful world of podcasts, I felt like Alice falling down the rabbit hole of adventure and excitement in Alice in Wonderland. I had instant access to shows on every topic imaginable: spirituality and faith, politics, history, self-improvement, cultural takes, and more. I now subscribe to and regularly follow a wide variety of podcasts.

I find I am a more well-rounded person when I learn from a range of voices and experiences. Doing so helps me become a more empathic and better human being.

In the last year, we have seen a racial reckoning rise up and take hold of our country. We have begun to wrestle with and understand the systematic racial oppression Black and brown people have experienced for far too long. While the United States has a long way to go, I hope there has been a positive shift in opening up these discussions.

One important way we can continue to grow and work for true change is to listen to and learn from voices whose perspectives are different from our own. In a particular way as women, we can learn from the female voices of Black and brown women.

As I strive to broaden the diversity of voices in my podcasts, I am learning from the following women.

Lettie Shumate from History Shows Us

Lettie is an articulate historian, who is committed to revealing what history shows us and making critical connections between the past and the present. Her thought-provoking conversations include a wide range of topics, including current events, racism, politics, and history, through the lens of racial justice.

Strong, passionate, and bold, Lettie is an African-American woman I have learned a lot from when it comes to our nation’s history, from its inception to the present. You will definitely be challenged by this podcast.

Alissa Molina and Patricia Taylor from The Upside Down Podcast

I have been listening to The Upside Down Podcast for a long time. This ecumenical podcast with a focus on justice, advocacy, and culturally relevant conversations has expanded my understanding on a variety of topics. The current co-hosts are women whose voices I, as a white woman, need to be listening to.

Alissa is a Latina woman, who created her own podcast miniseries and recently, a new media company called From Here. A fiery, passionate voice for hard conversation and advocacy, Alissa challenges me to think outside of the box.

Patricia is a Black woman living in America. She packs a hard punch in engaging in important conversations on things like racism and white supremacy under the hashtag #somethoughtsfromyourblackfriend. Patty’s strong voice of courage in these messy, necessary conversations will stretch you like a rubber band. As a white woman, I think it is critical to sit at the feet of Black women to learn from their pain and perspective, which is often vastly different than mine.

Michelle Higgins, Dr. Christina Edmondson, and Ekemini Uwan from Truth’s Table

Three Black women host Truth’s Table, “a podcast by Black women and for Black women, where we tackle politics, race, culture, and gender issues through a Christian lens.”

I am so grateful a friend shared this podcast with me several years ago. I would describe it as a place for Black women to express, share, and process their thoughts and experiences. As a white woman, I come to this table through a posture of listening and humility, nothing less.

In a time when our country can feel divided and hostile, it can be easy to want to stay in our own comfort zones. However, when we stretch ourselves to learn and grow beyond them, we become better, more just, and more loving versions of ourselves. Let’s learn and listen.