Despite the many problems pornography causes for women today, there are some glimmers of hope on the topic.

It may seem like we’re always being hit with a new discouraging fact about pornography. Whether it’s statistics on the age at which kids start watching porn (now kids are having first exposure to porn as young as ten and eleven) or the increase in searches for violent or dangerous content (incest is a new trend, according to Ernie Allen, former president of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children), or the connection of exposure to pornography to aggression in sexual behavior, the constant bombardment of important but discouraging news on porn can make you pessimistic about the future.

The topic of porn can be especially discouraging for women because it affects the men we’re dating, the men we’re married to, our behavior in relationships, and even ourselves—not to mention our current or future children who risk having their ideas of sex shaped by porn.

But it’s not all bad news. There are people doing their part to bring awareness to the harmfulness of pornography and its many links to sexual violence and trafficking, as well as how it can problematically shape a young person’s view of sex and consent. From grassroot movements to large social media conglomerates, here are some pieces of good news regarding pornography.

UK Blocks Porn for Underage Viewers

The United Kingdom has implemented a law that requires users to prove that they are over eighteen when using porn sites. The intent of this law is to protect underage viewers from potentially harmful content.

The law came about after the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) released survey statistics stating that most children and teenagers simply stumbled on pornography rather then intentionally seeking it out. Many of the children said that their opinions about sex and consent had been informed by pornography. NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless said, "A generation of children are in danger of being stripped of their childhoods at a young age by stumbling across extreme and violent porn online.”

For this reason, the United Kingdom insisted that in order to not be banned, porn sites would have to implement age-verification software that’s more sophisticated than simply a checkbox to say you’re over eighteen.

While this law doesn’t provide a guarantee for online safety, it is a step in the right direction. Because the United Kingdom took a stand, many websites that reach viewers across the globe will have to meet those standards.

Minnesota Bill Acknowledges Connection Between Sex Trafficking and Porn

A Minnesota bill is setting a precedent for how the United States might view the connection between pornography and sex trafficking going forward.

The first of its kind in the country, the bill “publicly recognizes the link between pornography and human trafficking,” and “adds language to include the use, prevalence, and involvement of pornography in the crime of human trafficking to the list of data that may be collected, thereby providing law enforcement better information to fight the commodification of human persons.”

While this isn’t a ban that prevents either sex trafficking or pornography, by recognizing the connection between the two, law enforcement can better protect the most vulnerable among us and potentially recognize signs of sex trafficking sooner.

Facebook Fights Revenge Pornography

Facebook recently launched The Non-Consensual Image Pilot Program in order to prevent revenge pornography from being shared on the social media platform.

This program allows people who are afraid that someone might post or message private and intimate photographs of them on Facebook, to get ahead of the situation. They can create a report and send the photos to the program’s team, who will use technology to prevent any future sharing. The team working on this program is small, and they use the report and photographs to create a digital fingerprint that is able to recognize and block the posting of these photographs. Facebook reportedly does not hold onto the photographs.

“It’s demeaning and devastating when someone’s intimate images are shared without permission, and we want to do everything we can to help victims of this abuse,” wrote Antigone Davis, Facebook’s Global Head of Safety.

These laws and programs are contributing to an ever growing social movement that recognizes that the porn industry can cause harm on both the supply and demand sides of the industry. Ultimately, these are steps toward the recognition of the need to protect the dignity and safety of human beings.

Communities of Anti-Porn Millennials Are Growing

If you feel inspired by these changes, and are looking for a community of support for people who opt out of supporting the porn industry, visit Fight the New Drug. This revolutionary group provides updates on wins for the anti-porn movement and give suggestions for how to continue the fight (they also sell bold t-shirts and swag that will serve as compelling conversation starters about the industry).

Other groups are helping people overcome the effects of porn by helping restore relationships from the infidelity-level betrayal many spouses feel when they find their partners are porn addicts. One such organization is Bloom, a psychotherapy-based program that provides support and coaching for women who find their relationship suffering.

There are also resources tailored to the growing number of women caught up in porn consumption or other compulsive sexual behaviors. Trailblazers like Lacy Alajna Bentley at HerRecoveryRoadmap.com offer books and support for this demographic.

While, the pervasiveness of pornography in our culture can sometimes make it seem like it's unstoppable, movements like these give us reason for hope.