George Clooney Dishes on How He Met Amal—and Other Notes from the Week

Catch up on all the news you might have missed with our handy summary of the week’s top stories.
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We’re pleased to bring you “While You Were Out”—the Verily editors’ quick takes on the happenings of this week.

White Roses Set the Stage for Historic Grammys Award Show

Arguably music’s biggest night of the year, the 2018 Grammy Awards followed the same tone as the Golden Globes Red Carpet Blackout, with white roses donning every celebrity’s outfit in support of Time’s Up movement against sexual misconduct—an organization founded only a month ago by Hollywood celebrities in response to the Weinstein allegations and #MeToo. While the film industry has been united for weeks on this movement, this is the first act of unification coming from the music industry—although, reports on how well it was executed is mixed, with justified criticism.

But that wasn’t the only historic turn of events. Short story? Bruno Mars kind of killed it, winning all six awards he was nominated for. No matter your opinion of the man or his music (of course, the internet was filled with opinions), Bruno Mars, according to Billboard.com, has now joined an “incredibly elite club of R&B artists who have nabbed album of the year,” joining Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, Natalie Cole, and Ray Charles.

My favorite takeaway? Kesha performing her powerful piece, Praying, simultaneously reminding me how much the national conversation has changed on sexual and emotional abuse since Kesha lost her lawsuit, and how far we still need to go. —Maria Walley

George Clooney Tells the Story of How He Met Amal

Your future spouse isn’t just going to show up on your front door—unless you are George Clooney, that is (natch). On David Letterman’s new Netflix show, My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman, talks about the day a mutual friend brought Amal to visit him at his Lake Como home and how the two hit it off right away. Clooney shares that he wasn’t sure if Amal was interested in being more than just friends.

“The funniest thing was my mom and dad were visiting so my parents were there,” he told Letterman. “And we just talked, we stayed up all night talking. And I got her email address, because she was going to send me some pictures of my parents. So we started writing. I didn’t know if she wanted to go out with me—I just thought we were buddies.”

George’s endearing modesty aside, we love that the Clooney’s romance began with friendship. There is nothing like finding someone you can stay up talking with until the sun comes up. —Monica Gabriel Marshall

Cleveland Indians Are Taking Logo Off Jerseys

After being a source of contention and debate for decades now, it’s finally been announced that the Chief Wahoo logo is being removed from the Indians' uniform next year. Starting in 2019 the mascot will disappear from caps and sleeves, but in the meantime uniforms and merchandise will still wear this symbol, which is deeply dissatisfying for many.

"I'm elated,'' Philip Yenyo, executive director of the American Indian Movement of Ohio, said.” "But at the same time, I think it should be this year. I don't understand why they're drawing this out. It doesn't make any sense to me, unless they want to continue to make what's basically blood money.''

With this precedent set in Cleveland, many are turning their gaze toward the Washington Redskins and its logo. The pressure could finally be on to follow suit. —MGM

Bill Gates Is Donating $100 Million to Curing Alzheimer’s Disease

This week Bill Gates revealed the sad news that his father suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. Gates shared this news by way of on explanation for why he is investing $100 million in a search for new treatment for the disease. 

On the Today show Gates relates to host Maria Shriver, whose father, the late Kennedy adviser and diplomat Sargent Shriver, also suffered from the disease and expressed his own fears about developing the disease himself one day. But, Gates also shared optimism about his ability to make a difference. “I’m an optimist. Bringing in new ideas, that’s what we’re going to have to do, to have great drugs for this in the next 10 to 15 years,” Gates explained. 

Among many of the questions Gates hopes to have answered, the mystery of when Alzheimer’s really gets started is on the top of his list. —MGM

Fake Porn Videos Reveal Disturbing Trend in the Industry

The good news? Pornographic videos that leveraged a new software called ‘FakeApp,’ which replaces the original faces of porn actresses with celebrity actresses are being deleted by the service that has been hosting the bulk of the content, Gfycat.

The bad news? That this disturbing thing actually happened—and thanks to the speedy light of technology—is apparently super easy to do.

“It works by using a machine-learning algorithm to create a computer-generated version of the subject's face,” the BBC reports. “To do this requires several hundred photos of the celebrity in question for analysis and a video clip of the person whose features are to be replaced.”

In a world where most of us can access several hundred photos of most people we know on the internet (thanks, FB!), these “deepfakes” (as what they’re calling them) definitely cause us to pause. —MW

Relic of St. Francis Xavier Brings Thousands Together

Thousands of Canadians flock together to see the severed arm of the prolific Catholic missionary, St. Francis Xavier—who died in 1552.  The co-founder of the Jesuit order, the same order Pope Francis takes part in, used this arm to baptize over 100,000 people in his lifetime, mostly in Asia. While St. Francis Xavier's body is entombed in Goa, India, this arm has been detached from the body since 1614 and is taking its rare trip outside of Rome to visit more than a dozen cities, Toronto included. "He's a pretty good roommate—he's pretty quiet," jokes D'Arcy Murphy, missionary and guardian of the relic. —MW

Latest School Shooting Suspect Is 12-Year-Old Female in L.A.

Following a bloody January, February of 2018 didn't take long to have its first school shooting. While certainly not the bloodiest of armed assaults, with both of the 15-year-old shooting victims still alive—and only one in "critical but stable condition"—it is notable that the shooter is not even a teenager. As of Thursday afternoon, police have not identified the motives of the young suspect, and little information has been released about her, other than she's being detained by authorities. 

Meanwhile, we can only wait to see if the motives the horrific event are ever to be revealed—and what could have possibly been going on in the girl's mind to trigger such a violent deed. —MW