The Best Way to Travel on an Airplane Based on Your Myers-Briggs Personality Type - Verily
To truly satisfy your wanderlust, look no further than your personality type.

With the holidays on the horizon, chances are you’ll be in a car, train, or plane a few times between now and 2018. Whether you’re super-scheduled or never pack until the last minute, travel styles vary greatly. Pete Mockaitis, an award-winning podcast host and Trainer in Chief at AwesomeAtYourJob.com, who recently led a Myers-Briggs seminar for the Verily team, explains how our personality types have a lot to do with our travel preferences, too. "I see the MBTI preferences of judging vs. perceiving and introversion vs. extroversion affecting travel the most," he tells me.

Knowing your preferred attitudes—what energizes you, what stresses you out—can clue you in to exactly what kind of traveler you are. Which one are you?

I—J Attitudes

ISTJ: "Those who prefer judging tend to take great pleasure in planning out the particular details of the trip," Mockaitis says. Should you arrive to find someone mistakingly in your seat, you're irked, but you're also the one helping your neighbor find the other half of her seatbelt so things can get moving.

ISFJ: Your conscientious spirit and desire for meaningful interactions means that you might probe your neighbor about what book she's reading while at the same time worrying over whether she thinks you're bothering her.

INFJ: Determined and insightful, you're white-knuckling it when the attendant reviews the "in case of a crash landing" info. Is there actually a floatation device under my seat, really? As you contemplate possible death or never making it to your destination, you're equally lost in daydreams about all the what-if's in life and making plans for the future.

INTJ: Your independence and originality means you relish the chance to unplug in flight. You're the type to leave your phone in your bag while it's stowed above—definitely not the one being told to "Please, switch to airplane mode" for the third time.

I—P Attitudes

ISTP: "Meanwhile," Mockaitis adds, "introverts are more likely to desire solo time." Solution-oriented and observant, the chaos of travel—screaming children, inefficient luggage handling, rude vacationers—ruffles your feathers a bit. You're the one traveling with a silk eye mask so you can retreat to your own little world.

ISFP: Your reserved nature makes you a window-seat dreamer. You're lost in the clouds, or a book. You're that person who can finish a book in one flight.

INFP: Your curiosity and understanding allow you to mindfully ignore what's happening around you as you contemplate the very nature of flight. Man, those Wright brothers were good!

INTP: Inclined toward ideation and in-depth interactions, you're likely to be a bit put off by all the strangers. But if the right moment presents itself, you might just be that one in a million who meets her future husband on a cross-country flight.

E—P Attitudes

ESTP: Mockaitis says, "Those who prefer perceiving can view travel as a refreshing opportunity to take a break from planning and just let things happen." Energetic and spontaneous, you're getting the free upgrade or complimentary drink tickets. Lucky!

ESFP: You have a collaborative and high-spirited temperament, which means being in airplane mode is a struggle for you. You're the one testing the limits. What really happens if I don't turn my phone off anyway? What will the attendant say if I ask for three bags of pretzels? You're gonna find out.

ENFP: You're lively and collaborative. If seated in an exit row, you're already imagining how you'd work with your seatmates to save all the passengers in the event of something horrible.

ENTP: With your outgoing and creative traits, you're the one to elaborately schmooze your way into getting extra amenities or charming the staff into divulging all their experts travel secrets with you.

E—J Attitudes

ESTJ: "Extroverts want to maximize time out seeing and doing all that there is to do in the new location," Mockaitis notes. Decisive and efficient, you're the one who paid extra for early boarding and more legroom and owns specialized travel bags for every occasion.

ESFJ: Your strong sense of teamwork and caring heart means you're one of the few people actually paying attention to safety demonstrations, helping others out with their bags, or offering to help frazzled parents calm a crying baby. Props to you!

ENFJ: Intuitive and responsible, you can't stand people trying to cut the boarding queue. At the same time, you're also the likeliest person to offer a comforting word to any nervous travelers beside you. Mockaitis also shares, "I’m an ENFJ . . . I’ll stare out the window and often get many new ideas about business and how to further optimize life. I’m sure to write them down before they escape forever."

ENTJ: Because you enjoy problem solving, achieving goals, and leading initiatives, loading up and getting into a car or plane is the bane of your existence. People heckling over whether "A" is the aisle or window is likely to drive you a little cray. You're probably thinking of an invention to make boarding ten times faster.