4 Awesome Romantic Films You Can Now Watch on Netflix—and What They Teach Us About Love

From classics to comedies, the romantic films are streaming, and we’ll be watching.
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From classics to comedies, the romantic films are streaming, and we’ll be watching.

October is shaping up to be a good month for our TV habits. Not only did several shows have their season premieres in recent weeks, but now Netflix is also giving us Christmas in October with the gift of some excellent additions to its streaming lineup.

If you want to have a good laugh and reminisce on some of your younger days, check out the teen classics Dazed and Confused or Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, which became available October 1. But if you’re more romance-minded, Netflix has made movie night extremely easy for you. While these emotional films are just plain enjoyable to watch, they also taught us a thing or two about love we’d be wise to revisit. So cue up Netflix, and let your love light shine.

Titanic

Crank up the Celine Dion, grab some tissues, and take a trip back to the early 1900s with Kate and Leo because there’s a reason this film is the second-highest-grossing film of all time (behind James Cameron’s other blockbuster Avatar). While not many of us can empathize with Rose’s (Kate Winslet) predicament of having to marry in order to save her family’s reputation or Jack’s (Leonardo DiCaprio) plight of being a poor nomad living on luck, we can relate to the notion of wanting more, of not settling. This is a long movie filled with devastation and a bit of recklessness, but what speaks to love’s power more than Rose, sitting freezing and wet on the deck of a rescue ship, deciding that she would rather be destitute than live in a loveless life with Cal, her fiancé? Jack and Rose were living a fantasy, sure, but witnessing a woman realizing that she deserves respect and admiration from a partner is inspiring to us all.

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days

Do you really need an excuse to revisit “how-to girl” Andie Anderson, ad man Benjamin Barry, and their infamous love fern? No, you don’t. This early 2000s hit is one of those that just never gets old. While the whole plot is born of poor motives and gaminess (never advisable!), the movie ultimately draws out some important truths. Arguably the best part of the movie is when Andie (Kate Hudson) goes to Ben’s (Matthew McConaughey) family’s home. Seeing Ben in his natural element and experiencing the real him is what ultimately makes her fall for him—flaws and all. In love, it’s true that those seemingly routine, even boring, moments (like playing a game of cards on the porch or figuring out that the shower nozzle works in the opposite direction) are actually what forge some of the truest connections.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Just in time for a barrage of Halloween costumes inspired by its leading lady, one of the great classics has returned to your stream. Holly Golightly’s (Audrey Hepburn) life is certainly full of some questionable behavior—endless “dates,” an estranged husband whom she married as an adolescent, and more. But for all her missteps, Holly ultimately ends up with an unlikely but far more genuine match. It took him pushing her to truly examine her life for her to realize that she was chasing all the wrong things and her true happiness was to be found with him. Many of us have experienced times in life when we felt aimless and just wanted the right person to come along. We won’t all be so lucky as to have a Cracker Jack ring bestowed upon us, but we can all make a commitment to slow down and think about what love really means to us and how we can seek it in a meaningful way.

A Cinderella Story

OK, yes, this is a corny rom-com that now lives in bargain bins at superstores, but Hilary Duff and Chad Michael Murray’s fairy tale–inspired storyline wasn’t all bad. Evil stepsisters and fifties-themed diners aside, this movie has some steadfast lessons within. Sam (Duff) struggles with her identity and losing her parents. “Nomad” aka Austin (Murray), Sam’s online pen pal turned love interest, faces insurmountable pressures and feels misunderstood. Sure, it’s all a little “high school,” but who can’t relate to those feelings? In the end, the movie proves that being yourself and sticking to your intuition is usually the best way to find happiness—and, hopefully, love.